Articles | Volume 12, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 12, 521–547, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-521-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 521–547, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-521-2018

Research article 13 Feb 2018

Research article | 13 Feb 2018

Increased West Antarctic and unchanged East Antarctic ice discharge over the last 7 years

Alex S. Gardner et al.

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Short summary
We map present-day Antarctic surface velocities from Landsat imagery and compare to earlier estimates from radar. Flow accelerations across the grounding lines of West Antarctica's Amundsen Sea Embayment, Getz Ice Shelf and the western Antarctic Peninsula, account for 89 % of the observed increase in ice discharge. In contrast, glaciers draining the East Antarctic have been remarkably stable. Our work suggests that patterns of mass loss are part of a longer-term phase of enhanced flow.