Articles | Volume 12, issue 5
The Cryosphere, 12, 1791–1809, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1791-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 1791–1809, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1791-2018

Research article 30 May 2018

Research article | 30 May 2018

Warm winter, thin ice?

Julienne C. Stroeve et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Julienne Stroeve on behalf of the Authors (12 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (15 Mar 2018) by Chris Derksen
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (22 Mar 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (29 Mar 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (29 Mar 2018) by Chris Derksen
AR by Julienne Stroeve on behalf of the Authors (09 Apr 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (10 Apr 2018) by Chris Derksen
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Short summary
This paper looks at the impact of the warm winter and anomalously low number of total freezing degree days during winter 2016/2017 on thermodynamic ice growth and overall thickness anomalies. The approach relies on evaluation of satellite data (CryoSat-2) and model output. While there is a negative feedback between rapid ice growth for thin ice, with thermodynamic ice growth increasing over time, since 2012 that relationship is changing, in part because the freeze-up is happening later.