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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 9, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 9, 1265–1276, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-1265-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 9, 1265–1276, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-1265-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 22 Jun 2015

Research article | 22 Jun 2015

Automatic monitoring of the effective thermal conductivity of snow in a low-Arctic shrub tundra

F. Domine et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Mathieu Barrere on behalf of the Authors (10 May 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (31 May 2015) by Martin Schneebeli
AR by Florent Dominé on behalf of the Authors (02 Jun 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
The thermal conductivity of Arctic snow strongly impacts ground temperature, nutrient recycling and vegetation growth. We have monitored the thermal conductivity of snow in low-Arctic shrub tundra for two consecutive winters using heated needle probes. We observe very different thermal conductivity evolutions in both winters studied, with more extensive melting in the second winter. Results illustrate the effect of vegetation on snow properties and the need to include it in snow physics models.
The thermal conductivity of Arctic snow strongly impacts ground temperature, nutrient recycling...
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