Articles | Volume 16, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1483-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1483-2022
Research article
 | 
27 Apr 2022
Research article |  | 27 Apr 2022

Influences of changing sea ice and snow thicknesses on simulated Arctic winter heat fluxes

Laura L. Landrum and Marika M. Holland

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Latest update: 11 Apr 2024
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Short summary
High-latitude Arctic wintertime sea ice and snow insulate the relatively warmer ocean from the colder atmosphere. As the climate warms, wintertime Arctic conductive heat fluxes increase even when the sea ice concentrations remain high. Simulations from the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble (CESM1-LE) show how sea ice and snow thicknesses, as well as the distribution of these thicknesses, significantly impact large-scale calculations of wintertime surface heat budgets in the Arctic.