Articles | Volume 15, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 15, 863–881, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-863-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 863–881, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-863-2021

Research article 18 Feb 2021

Research article | 18 Feb 2021

First investigation of perennial ice in Winter Wonderland Cave, Uinta Mountains, Utah, USA

Jeffrey S. Munroe

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (11 Nov 2020) by Christian Hauck
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (24 Nov 2020)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (10 Dec 2020) by Christian Hauck
RR by Aurel Perşoiu (16 Dec 2020)
RR by Marc Luetscher (23 Dec 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (11 Jan 2021) by Christian Hauck
AR by Jeffrey Munroe on behalf of the Authors (13 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (14 Jan 2021) by Christian Hauck
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Short summary
This study investigated a cave in Utah (USA) that contains a deposit of perennial ice. Such ice caves are important sources of information about past climate and are currently threatened by rising temperatures. The origin (precipitation), thickness (3 m), and age (several centuries) of the ice were constrained by a variety of methods. Liquid water recently entered the cave for the first time in many years, suggesting a destabilization of the cave environment.