Articles | Volume 15, issue 10
The Cryosphere, 15, 5007–5016, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-5007-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 5007–5016, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-5007-2021

Research article 29 Oct 2021

Research article | 29 Oct 2021

Wind-induced seismic noise at the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica Station

Baptiste Frankinet et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (12 May 2021) by Adam Booth
AR by Baptiste Frankinet on behalf of the Authors (08 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (15 Jun 2021) by Adam Booth
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (24 Jun 2021)
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (05 Jul 2021) by Adam Booth
AR by Baptiste Frankinet on behalf of the Authors (16 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 Aug 2021) by Adam Booth
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (31 Aug 2021)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (02 Sep 2021) by Adam Booth
AR by Baptiste Frankinet on behalf of the Authors (15 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Icequakes are the result of processes occurring within the ice mass or between the ice and its environment. Having a complete catalogue of those icequakes provides a unique view on the ice dynamics. But the instruments recording these events are polluted by different noise sources such as the wind. Using the data from multiple instruments, we found how the wind noise affects the icequake monitoring at the Princess Elisabeth Station in Antarctica.