Articles | Volume 15, issue 9
The Cryosphere, 15, 4501–4516, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-4501-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 4501–4516, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-4501-2021

Research article 24 Sep 2021

Research article | 24 Sep 2021

Giant ice rings in southern Baikal: multi-satellite data help to study ice cover dynamics and eddies under ice

Alexei V. Kouraev et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2021-146', Anonymous Referee #1, 14 Jun 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Alexei Kouraev, 27 Jul 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on tc-2021-146', Anonymous Referee #2, 22 Jun 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Alexei Kouraev, 27 Jul 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (06 Aug 2021) by Homa Kheyrollah Pour
AR by Alexei Kouraev on behalf of the Authors (09 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (10 Aug 2021) by Homa Kheyrollah Pour
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (16 Aug 2021)
ED: Publish as is (26 Aug 2021) by Homa Kheyrollah Pour
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Short summary
Giant ice rings are a beautiful and puzzling natural phenomenon. Our data show that ice rings are generated by lens-like warm eddies below the ice. We use multi-satellite data to analyse lake ice cover in the presence of eddies in April 2020 in southern Baikal. Unusual changes in ice colour may be explained by the competing influences of atmosphere above and the warm eddy below the ice. Tracking ice floes also helps to estimate eddy currents and their influence on the upper water layer.