Articles | Volume 15, issue 8
The Cryosphere, 15, 3555–3575, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3555-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 3555–3575, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3555-2021

Research article 03 Aug 2021

Research article | 03 Aug 2021

Recent degradation of interior Alaska permafrost mapped with ground surveys, geophysics, deep drilling, and repeat airborne lidar

Thomas A. Douglas et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2021-47', Sebastian Wetterich, 25 Mar 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on tc-2021-47', Anonymous Referee #2, 14 Apr 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (22 Apr 2021) by Peter Morse
AR by Thomas Douglas on behalf of the Authors (22 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 May 2021) by Peter Morse
AR by Sarah Buchmann on behalf of the Authors (18 May 2021)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (18 May 2021) by Peter Morse
AR by Thomas Douglas on behalf of the Authors (12 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
Permafrost is actively degrading across high latitudes due to climate warming. We combined thousands of end-of-summer active layer measurements, permafrost temperatures, geophysical surveys, deep borehole drilling, and repeat airborne lidar to quantify permafrost warming and thawing at sites across central Alaska. We calculate the mass of permafrost soil carbon potentially exposed to thaw over the past 7 years (0.44 Pg) is similar to the yearly carbon dioxide emissions of Australia.