Articles | Volume 15, issue 5
The Cryosphere, 15, 2167–2186, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-2167-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 2167–2186, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-2167-2021

Research article 04 May 2021

Research article | 04 May 2021

Linking sea ice deformation to ice thickness redistribution using high-resolution satellite and airborne observations

Luisa von Albedyll et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 Feb 2021) by Jennifer Hutchings
AR by Luisa von Albedyll on behalf of the Authors (24 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (11 Mar 2021) by Jennifer Hutchings
AR by Luisa von Albedyll on behalf of the Authors (19 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (23 Mar 2021) by Jennifer Hutchings
AR by Luisa von Albedyll on behalf of the Authors (24 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Convergent sea ice motion produces a thick ice cover through ridging. We studied sea ice deformation derived from high-resolution satellite imagery and related it to the corresponding thickness change. We found that deformation explains the observed dynamic thickness change. We show that deformation can be used to model realistic ice thickness distributions. Our results revealed new relationships between thickness redistribution and deformation that could improve sea ice models.