Articles | Volume 15, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 15, 1587–1606, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-1587-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 1587–1606, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-1587-2021

Research article 01 Apr 2021

Research article | 01 Apr 2021

Winter drainage of surface lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet from Sentinel-1 SAR imagery

Corinne L. Benedek and Ian C. Willis

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (23 Sep 2020) by Stef Lhermitte
AR by Corinne Benedek on behalf of the Authors (28 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (11 Dec 2020) by Stef Lhermitte
RR by Andrew Sole (28 Dec 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (18 Jan 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Jan 2021) by Stef Lhermitte
AR by Corinne Benedek on behalf of the Authors (03 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (04 Feb 2021) by Stef Lhermitte
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Short summary
The surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet contains thousands of surface lakes. These lakes can deliver water through cracks to the ice sheet base and influence the speed of ice flow. Here we look at instances of lakes draining in the middle of winter using the Sentinel-1 radar satellites. Winter-draining lakes can help us understand the mechanisms for lake drainages throughout the year and can point to winter movement of water that will impact our understanding of ice sheet hydrology.