Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
The Cryosphere, 14, 4083–4102, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4083-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 4083–4102, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4083-2020

Research article 18 Nov 2020

Research article | 18 Nov 2020

Reconciling the surface temperature–surface mass balance relationship in models and ice cores in Antarctica over the last 2 centuries

Marie G. P. Cavitte et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (09 Sep 2020) by Ruth Mottram
AR by Marie G. P. Cavitte on behalf of the Authors (09 Sep 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (08 Oct 2020) by Ruth Mottram
AR by Marie G. P. Cavitte on behalf of the Authors (12 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
Surface mass balance (SMB) and surface air temperature (SAT) are correlated at the regional scale for most of Antarctica, SMB and δ18O. Areas with low/no correlation are where wind processes (foehn, katabatic wind warming, and erosion) are sufficiently active to overwhelm the synoptic-scale snow accumulation. Measured in ice cores, the link between SMB, SAT, and δ18O is much weaker. Random noise can be removed by core record averaging but local processes perturb the correlation systematically.