Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3907-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3907-2020
Research article
 | 
11 Nov 2020
Research article |  | 11 Nov 2020

Permafrost thawing exhibits a greater influence on bacterial richness and community structure than permafrost age in Arctic permafrost soils

Mukan Ji, Weidong Kong, Chao Liang, Tianqi Zhou, Hongzeng Jia, and Xiaobin Dong

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Latest update: 20 May 2024
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Short summary
Old permafrost soil usually has more carbohydrates, while younger soil contains more aliphatic carbons, which substantially impacts soil bacterial communities. However, little is known about how permafrost age and thawing drive microbial communities. We found that permafrost thawing significantly increased bacterial richness in young permafrost and changed soil bacterial compositions at all ages. This suggests that thawing results in distinct bacterial species and alters soil carbon degradation.