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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Short summary
From 1 m snow profiles along a traverse on the East Antarctic Plateau, we calculated a representative surface snow density of 355 kg m−3 for this region with an error less than 1.5 %. This density is 10 % higher and density fluctuations seem to happen on smaller scales than climate model outputs suggest. Our study can help improve the parameterization of surface snow density in climate models to reduce the error in future sea level predictions.
TC | Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
The Cryosphere, 14, 3663–3685, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3663-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 3663–3685, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3663-2020

Research article 05 Nov 2020

Research article | 05 Nov 2020

Representative surface snow density on the East Antarctic Plateau

Alexander H. Weinhart et al.

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Short summary
From 1 m snow profiles along a traverse on the East Antarctic Plateau, we calculated a representative surface snow density of 355 kg m−3 for this region with an error less than 1.5 %. This density is 10 % higher and density fluctuations seem to happen on smaller scales than climate model outputs suggest. Our study can help improve the parameterization of surface snow density in climate models to reduce the error in future sea level predictions.
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