Articles | Volume 14, issue 9
The Cryosphere, 14, 3195–3207, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3195-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 3195–3207, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3195-2020
Research article
21 Sep 2020
Research article | 21 Sep 2020

How much snow falls in the world's mountains? A first look at mountain snowfall estimates in A-train observations and reanalyses

Anne Sophie Daloz et al.

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Latest update: 16 May 2022
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Short summary
The total of snow that falls globally is a critical factor governing freshwater availability. To better understand how this resource is impacted by climate change, we need to know how reliable the current observational datasets for snow are. Here, we compare five datasets looking at the snow falling over the mountains versus the other continents. We show that there is a large consensus when looking at fractional contributions but strong dissimilarities when comparing magnitudes.