Articles | Volume 14, issue 9
The Cryosphere, 14, 3195–3207, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3195-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 3195–3207, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-3195-2020

Research article 21 Sep 2020

Research article | 21 Sep 2020

How much snow falls in the world's mountains? A first look at mountain snowfall estimates in A-train observations and reanalyses

Anne Sophie Daloz et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (22 Apr 2020) by Guillaume Chambon
AR by Anne Sophie Daloz on behalf of the Authors (29 May 2020)  Author's response
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (26 Jun 2020) by Guillaume Chambon
AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (29 Jun 2020)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (08 Jul 2020) by Guillaume Chambon
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (19 Jul 2020)
RR by Jean-Baptiste Madeleine (20 Jul 2020)
ED: Publish as is (24 Jul 2020) by Guillaume Chambon
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Short summary
The total of snow that falls globally is a critical factor governing freshwater availability. To better understand how this resource is impacted by climate change, we need to know how reliable the current observational datasets for snow are. Here, we compare five datasets looking at the snow falling over the mountains versus the other continents. We show that there is a large consensus when looking at fractional contributions but strong dissimilarities when comparing magnitudes.