Articles | Volume 14, issue 9
The Cryosphere, 14, 2835–2848, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-2835-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 2835–2848, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-2835-2020
Research article
03 Sep 2020
Research article | 03 Sep 2020

Soil respiration of alpine meadow is controlled by freeze–thaw processes of active layer in the permafrost region of the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau

Junfeng Wang et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
The active layer, a buffer between permafrost and the atmosphere, is more sensitive and responds more quickly to climate change. How the freeze–thaw action at different stages regulates carbon emissions is still unclear. We conducted 2-year continuous in situ measurements in an alpine meadow permafrost ecosystem in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau and found the freeze–thaw process modified the Rs dynamics differently in different stages. Results suggest great changes in freeze–thaw process patterns.