Articles | Volume 14, issue 7
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-2495-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-2495-2020
Research article
 | 
31 Jul 2020
Research article |  | 31 Jul 2020

Historical Northern Hemisphere snow cover trends and projected changes in the CMIP6 multi-model ensemble

Lawrence Mudryk, María Santolaria-Otín, Gerhard Krinner, Martin Ménégoz, Chris Derksen, Claire Brutel-Vuilmet, Mike Brady, and Richard Essery

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Latest update: 27 Feb 2024
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Short summary
We analyze how well updated state-of-the-art climate models reproduce observed historical snow cover extent and snow mass and how they project that these quantities will change up to the year 2100. Overall the updated models better represent historical snow extent than previous models, and they simulate stronger historical trends in snow extent and snow mass. They project that spring snow extent will decrease by 8 % for each degree Celsius that the global surface air temperature increases.