Articles | Volume 13, issue 12
The Cryosphere, 13, 3383–3403, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-3383-2019
The Cryosphere, 13, 3383–3403, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-3383-2019

Research article 17 Dec 2019

Research article | 17 Dec 2019

Multi-tracer study of gas trapping in an East Antarctic ice core

Kévin Fourteau et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (14 Oct 2019) by Jean-Louis Tison
AR by Kevin Fourteau on behalf of the Authors (18 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (29 Oct 2019) by Jean-Louis Tison

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Kevin Fourteau on behalf of the Authors (09 Dec 2019)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (16 Dec 2019) by Jean-Louis Tison
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Short summary
Understanding gas trapping in polar ice is essential to study the relationship between greenhouse gases and past climates. New data of bubble closure, used in a simple gas-trapping model, show inconsistency with the final air content in ice. This suggests gas trapping is not fully understood. We also use a combination of high-resolution measurements to investigate the effect of polar snow stratification on gas trapping and find that all strata have similar pores, but that some close in advance.