Articles | Volume 13, issue 9
The Cryosphere, 13, 2407–2419, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-2407-2019
The Cryosphere, 13, 2407–2419, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-2407-2019

Research article 17 Sep 2019

Research article | 17 Sep 2019

Very old firn air linked to strong density layering at Styx Glacier, coastal Victoria Land, East Antarctica

Youngjoon Jang et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (26 Jun 2019) by Joel Savarino
AR by Jinho Ahn on behalf of the Authors (06 Jul 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (10 Jul 2019) by Joel Savarino
AR by Jinho Ahn on behalf of the Authors (16 Jul 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We can learn how human activity altered atmospheric air from the interstitial air in the porous snow layer (firn) on top of glaciers. However, old firn air (> 55 years) was observed only at sites where surface temperatures and snow accumulation rates are very low, such as the South Pole. In this study, we report an unusually old firn air with CO2 age of 93 years from Styx Glacier, near the Ross Sea coast in Antarctica. We hypothesize that the large snow density variations increase firn air ages.