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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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TC | Articles | Volume 13, issue 4
The Cryosphere, 13, 1267–1281, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-1267-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 13, 1267–1281, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-1267-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 16 Apr 2019

Research article | 16 Apr 2019

The evolution of snow bedforms in the Colorado Front Range and the processes that shape them

Kelly Kochanski et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Kelly Kochanski on behalf of the Authors (02 Apr 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (03 Apr 2019) by Martin Schneebeli
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Wind-blown snow does not lie flat. It forms dunes, ripples, and anvil-shaped sastrugi. These features ornament much of the snow on Earth and change the snow's effects on polar climates, but they have rarely been studied. We spent three winters watching snow move through the Colorado Front Range and present our findings here, including the first time-lapse videos of snow dune and sastrugi growth.
Wind-blown snow does not lie flat. It forms dunes, ripples, and anvil-shaped sastrugi. These...
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