Articles | Volume 13, issue 1
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-125-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-125-2019
Research article
 | 
14 Jan 2019
Research article |  | 14 Jan 2019

New insight from CryoSat-2 sea ice thickness for sea ice modelling

David Schröder, Danny L. Feltham, Michel Tsamados, Andy Ridout, and Rachel Tilling

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Latest update: 27 Feb 2024
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Short summary
This paper uses sea ice thickness data (CryoSat-2) to identify and correct shortcomings in simulating winter ice growth in the widely used sea ice model CICE. Adding a model of snow drift and using a different scheme for calculating the ice conductivity improve model results. Sensitivity studies demonstrate that atmospheric winter conditions have little impact on winter ice growth, and the fate of Arctic summer sea ice is largely controlled by atmospheric conditions during the melting season.