Articles | Volume 11, issue 2
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-681-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-681-2017
Research article
 | 
08 Mar 2017
Research article |  | 08 Mar 2017

Assessment of NASA airborne laser altimetry data using ground-based GPS data near Summit Station, Greenland

Kelly M. Brunt, Robert L. Hawley, Eric R. Lutz, Michael Studinger, John G. Sonntag, Michelle A. Hofton, Lauren C. Andrews, and Thomas A. Neumann

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Latest update: 03 Mar 2024
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Short summary
This manuscript presents an analysis of NASA airborne lidar data based on in situ GPS measurements from the interior of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Results show that for two airborne altimeters, surface elevation biases are less than 0.12 m and measurement precisions are 0.09 m or better. The study concludes that two NASA airborne lidars are sufficiently characterized to form part of a satellite data validation strategy, specifically for ICESat-2, scheduled to launch in 2018.