Articles | Volume 17, issue 8
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-17-3251-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-17-3251-2023
Research article
 | 
11 Aug 2023
Research article |  | 11 Aug 2023

Everest South Col Glacier did not thin during the period 1984–2017

Fanny Brun, Owen King, Marion Réveillet, Charles Amory, Anton Planchot, Etienne Berthier, Amaury Dehecq, Tobias Bolch, Kévin Fourteau, Julien Brondex, Marie Dumont, Christoph Mayer, Silvan Leinss, Romain Hugonnet, and Patrick Wagnon

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Latest update: 12 Jun 2024
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Short summary
The South Col Glacier is a small body of ice and snow located on the southern ridge of Mt. Everest. A recent study proposed that South Col Glacier is rapidly losing mass. In this study, we examined the glacier thickness change for the period 1984–2017 and found no thickness change. To reconcile these results, we investigate wind erosion and surface energy and mass balance and find that melt is unlikely a dominant process, contrary to previous findings.