Articles | Volume 17, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-17-1585-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-17-1585-2023
Research article
 | 
12 Apr 2023
Research article |  | 12 Apr 2023

Compensating errors in inversions for subglacial bed roughness: same steady state, different dynamic response

Constantijn J. Berends, Roderik S. W. van de Wal, Tim van den Akker, and William H. Lipscomb

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Latest update: 18 Jun 2024
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Short summary
The rate at which the Antarctic ice sheet will melt because of anthropogenic climate change is uncertain. Part of this uncertainty stems from processes occurring beneath the ice, such as the way the ice slides over the underlying bedrock. Inversion methods attempt to use observations of the ice-sheet surface to calculate how these sliding processes work. We show that such methods cannot fully solve this problem, so a substantial uncertainty still remains in projections of sea-level rise.