Articles | Volume 16, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 16, 559–579, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-559-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 559–579, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-559-2022

Research article 15 Feb 2022

Research article | 15 Feb 2022

Modelling surface temperature and radiation budget of snow-covered complex terrain

Alvaro Robledano et al.

Data sets

Snow surface temperature in mountainous areas A. Robledano, G. Picard, and L. Arnaud https://doi.org/10.18709/perscido.2022.02.ds365

ERA5 hourly data on pressure levels from 1979 to present H. Hersbach, B. Bell, P. Berrisford, G. Biavati, A. Horányi, J. Muñoz Sabater, J. Nicolas, C. Peubey, R. Radu, I. Rozum, D. Schepers, A. Simmons, C. Soci, D. Dee, and J.-N. Thépaut https://doi.org/10.24381/cds.bd0915c6

Model code and software

ghislainp/snowoptics: TC paper (tc_paper) G. Picard https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3742138

ghislainp/atmosrt: roughseb_paper_robledano_TC2022 G. Picard https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6046832

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Short summary
Topography controls the surface temperature of snow-covered, mountainous areas. We developed a modelling chain that uses ray-tracing methods to quantify the impact of a few topographic effects on snow surface temperature at high spatial resolution. Its large spatial and temporal variations are correctly simulated over a 50 km2 area in the French Alps, and our results show that excluding a single topographic effect results in cooling (or warming) effects on the order of 1 °C.