Articles | Volume 16, issue 8
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-3181-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-3181-2022
Research article
 | 
05 Aug 2022
Research article |  | 05 Aug 2022

Thickness of multi-year sea ice on the northern Canadian polar shelf: a second look after 40 years

Humfrey Melling

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Latest update: 24 Jul 2024
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Short summary
The Canadian polar shelf has the world’s thickest old sea ice. Its islands impede ice drift to warmer seas. The first year of data from up-looking sonar viewing this shelf’s ice reveal that thick (> 3 m) old ice remains plentiful here, in contrast to its growing scarcity elsewhere. Arctic circulation continues to pack ice against the islands and during storms to create by ridging the very thick ice found here. This study reveals the importance of ridging to the mass balance of Arctic sea ice.