Articles | Volume 16, issue 4
The Cryosphere, 16, 1369–1381, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1369-2022
The Cryosphere, 16, 1369–1381, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-1369-2022
Research article
13 Apr 2022
Research article | 13 Apr 2022

The role of föhn winds in eastern Antarctic Peninsula rapid ice shelf collapse

Matthew K. Laffin et al.

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Short summary
The collapses of the Larsen A and B ice shelves on the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) occurred while the ice shelves were covered with large melt lakes, and ocean waves damaged the ice shelf fronts, triggering collapse. Observations show föhn winds were present on both ice shelves and increased surface melt and drove sea ice away from the ice front. Collapsed ice shelves experienced enhanced surface melt driven by föhn winds, whereas extant ice shelves are affected less by föhn-wind-induced melt.