Articles | Volume 15, issue 6
The Cryosphere, 15, 3013–3019, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3013-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 3013–3019, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3013-2021

Brief communication 30 Jun 2021

Brief communication | 30 Jun 2021

Brief communication: Reduction in the future Greenland ice sheet surface melt with the help of solar geoengineering

Xavier Fettweis et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (11 Mar 2021) by Brice Noël
AR by Xavier Fettweis on behalf of the Authors (20 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Apr 2021) by Brice Noël
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (12 May 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (19 May 2021) by Brice Noël
AR by Xavier Fettweis on behalf of the Authors (27 May 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (04 Jun 2021) by Brice Noël
AR by Xavier Fettweis on behalf of the Authors (05 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Without any reduction in our greenhouse gas emissions, the Greenland ice sheet surface mass loss can be brought in line with a medium-mitigation emissions scenario by reducing the solar downward flux at the top of the atmosphere by 1.5 %. In addition to reducing global warming, these solar geoengineering measures also dampen the well-known positive melt–albedo feedback over the ice sheet by 6 %. However, only stronger reductions in solar radiation could maintain a stable ice sheet in 2100.