Articles | Volume 15, issue 5
The Cryosphere, 15, 2315–2331, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-2315-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 2315–2331, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-2315-2021

Research article 18 May 2021

Research article | 18 May 2021

Hourly surface meltwater routing for a Greenlandic supraglacial catchment across hillslopes and through a dense topological channel network

Colin J. Gleason et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (23 Feb 2021) by Nanna Bjørnholt Karlsson
AR by Colin Gleason on behalf of the Authors (25 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Feb 2021) by Nanna Bjørnholt Karlsson
RR by Sammie Buzzard (13 Mar 2021)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (26 Mar 2021) by Nanna Bjørnholt Karlsson
AR by Colin Gleason on behalf of the Authors (30 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Colin Gleason on behalf of the Authors (04 May 2021)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (06 May 2021) by Nanna Bjørnholt Karlsson
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Short summary
We apply first-principle hydrology models designed for global river routing to route flows hourly through 10 000 individual supraglacial channels in Greenland. Our results uniquely show the role of process controls (network density, hillslope flow, channel friction) on routed meltwater. We also confirm earlier suggestions that large channels do not dewater overnight despite the shutdown of runoff and surface mass balance runoff being mistimed and overproducing runoff, as validated in situ.