Articles | Volume 15, issue 4
The Cryosphere, 15, 1863–1880, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-1863-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 1863–1880, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-1863-2021

Research article 19 Apr 2021

Research article | 19 Apr 2021

Grounding zone subglacial properties from calibrated active-source seismic methods

Huw J. Horgan et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (17 Oct 2020) by Reinhard Drews
AR by Huw Horgan on behalf of the Authors (13 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (18 Dec 2020) by Reinhard Drews
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (21 Dec 2020) by Reinhard Drews
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (05 Jan 2021)
RR by Alex Brisbourne (15 Jan 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Jan 2021) by Reinhard Drews
AR by Huw Horgan on behalf of the Authors (03 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (14 Feb 2021) by Reinhard Drews
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Short summary
The grounding zone marks the transition from a grounded ice sheet to a floating ice shelf. Like Earth's coastlines, the grounding zone is home to interactions between the ocean, fresh water, and geology but also has added complexity and importance due to the overriding ice. Here we use seismic surveying – sending sound waves down through the ice – to image the grounding zone of Whillans Ice Stream in West Antarctica and learn more about the nature of this important transition zone.