Articles | Volume 15, issue 4
The Cryosphere, 15, 1845–1862, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-1845-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 1845–1862, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-1845-2021

Research article 14 Apr 2021

Research article | 14 Apr 2021

Spatially and temporally resolved ice loss in High Mountain Asia and the Gulf of Alaska observed by CryoSat-2 swath altimetry between 2010 and 2019

Livia Jakob et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (15 Dec 2020) by Etienne Berthier
AR by Livia Jakob on behalf of the Authors (05 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (13 Jan 2021) by Etienne Berthier
RR by Tobias Bolch (16 Feb 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (16 Feb 2021) by Etienne Berthier
AR by Livia Jakob on behalf of the Authors (23 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (26 Feb 2021) by Etienne Berthier
AR by Livia Jakob on behalf of the Authors (04 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Glaciers and ice caps are currently the largest contributor to sea level rise. Global monitoring of these regions is a challenging task, and significant differences remain between current estimates. This study looks at glacier changes in High Mountain Asia and the Gulf of Alaska using a new technique, which for the first time makes the use of satellite radar altimetry for mapping ice mass loss over mountain glacier regions possible.