Articles | Volume 14, issue 12
The Cryosphere, 14, 4299–4322, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4299-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 4299–4322, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4299-2020

Research article 01 Dec 2020

Research article | 01 Dec 2020

Large and irreversible future decline of the Greenland ice sheet

Jonathan M. Gregory et al.

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Latest update: 23 Sep 2021
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Short summary
Melting of the Greenland ice sheet as a consequence of global warming could raise global-mean sea level by up to 7 m. We have studied this using a newly developed computer model. With recent climate maintained, sea level would rise by 0.5–2.5 m over many millennia due to Greenland ice loss: the warmer the climate, the greater the sea level rise. Beyond about 3.5 m it would become partially irreversible. In order to avoid this outcome, anthropogenic climate change must be reversed soon enough.