Articles | Volume 14, issue 12
The Cryosphere, 14, 4299–4322, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4299-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 4299–4322, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4299-2020

Research article 01 Dec 2020

Research article | 01 Dec 2020

Large and irreversible future decline of the Greenland ice sheet

Jonathan M. Gregory et al.

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ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (04 Oct 2020) by Jan De Rydt
AR by Jonathan M. Gregory on behalf of the Authors (05 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (22 Oct 2020) by Jan De Rydt
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Short summary
Melting of the Greenland ice sheet as a consequence of global warming could raise global-mean sea level by up to 7 m. We have studied this using a newly developed computer model. With recent climate maintained, sea level would rise by 0.5–2.5 m over many millennia due to Greenland ice loss: the warmer the climate, the greater the sea level rise. Beyond about 3.5 m it would become partially irreversible. In order to avoid this outcome, anthropogenic climate change must be reversed soon enough.