Articles | Volume 13, issue 9
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-2317-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-2317-2019
Brief communication
 | 
06 Sep 2019
Brief communication |  | 06 Sep 2019

Brief communication: A submarine wall protecting the Amundsen Sea intensifies melting of neighboring ice shelves

Özgür Gürses, Vanessa Kolatschek, Qiang Wang, and Christian Bernd Rodehacke

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Latest update: 24 Feb 2024
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Short summary
The warming of the Earth's climate system causes sea level rise. In Antarctica, ice streams flow into the sea and develop ice shelves. These are floating extensions of the ice streams. Ocean water melts these ice shelves. It has been proposed that a submarine wall could shield these ice shelves from the warm water. Our model simulation shows that the wall protects ice shelves. However, the warm water flows to neighboring ice shelves. There, enhanced melting reduces the effectiveness of the wall.