Articles | Volume 12, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 12, 413–431, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-413-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 413–431, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-413-2018
Research article
06 Feb 2018
Research article | 06 Feb 2018

Black carbon and mineral dust in snow cover on the Tibetan Plateau

Yulan Zhang et al.

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Short summary
Light-absorbing impurities deposited on snow can reduce surface albedo and contribute to the near-worldwide melting of snowpack and ice. This study focused on the black carbon and mineral dust in snow cover on the Tibetan Plateau. We discussed their concentrations, distributions, possible sources, and albedo reduction and radiative forcing. Findings indicated that the impacts of black carbon and mineral dust need to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections.