Articles | Volume 12, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 12, 413–431, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-413-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 413–431, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-413-2018

Research article 06 Feb 2018

Research article | 06 Feb 2018

Black carbon and mineral dust in snow cover on the Tibetan Plateau

Yulan Zhang et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (11 Oct 2017)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (14 Oct 2017) by Becky Alexander
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Dec 2017) by Becky Alexander
AR by Shichang Kang on behalf of the Authors (22 Dec 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (04 Jan 2018) by Becky Alexander
AR by Shichang Kang on behalf of the Authors (04 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Light-absorbing impurities deposited on snow can reduce surface albedo and contribute to the near-worldwide melting of snowpack and ice. This study focused on the black carbon and mineral dust in snow cover on the Tibetan Plateau. We discussed their concentrations, distributions, possible sources, and albedo reduction and radiative forcing. Findings indicated that the impacts of black carbon and mineral dust need to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections.