Articles | Volume 12, issue 7
The Cryosphere, 12, 2501–2513, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-2501-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 2501–2513, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-2501-2018
Brief communication
27 Jul 2018
Brief communication | 27 Jul 2018

Brief communication: Understanding solar geoengineering's potential to limit sea level rise requires attention from cryosphere experts

Peter J. Irvine et al.

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Latest update: 08 Aug 2022
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Short summary
Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, a form of solar geoengineering, is a proposal to add a reflective layer of aerosol to the upper atmosphere. This would reduce sea level rise by slowing the melting of ice on land and the thermal expansion of the oceans. However, there is considerable uncertainty about its potential efficacy. This article highlights key uncertainties in the sea level response to solar geoengineering and recommends approaches to address these in future work.