Articles | Volume 12, issue 7
The Cryosphere, 12, 2249–2266, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-2249-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 2249–2266, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-2249-2018

Research article 12 Jul 2018

Research article | 12 Jul 2018

Simulated retreat of Jakobshavn Isbræ since the Little Ice Age controlled by geometry

Nadine Steiger et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Nadine Steiger on behalf of the Authors (13 Feb 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (19 Feb 2018) by Olaf Eisen
RR by Johannes H. Bondzio (04 Apr 2018)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (04 Apr 2018) by Olaf Eisen
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (06 Apr 2018) by Olaf Eisen
AR by Nadine Steiger on behalf of the Authors (06 Apr 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (09 Apr 2018) by Olaf Eisen
RR by Ellyn Enderlin (20 Apr 2018)
RR by Andreas Vieli (26 Apr 2018)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (27 Apr 2018) by Olaf Eisen
AR by Nadine Steiger on behalf of the Authors (09 Jun 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (20 Jun 2018) by Olaf Eisen
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Short summary
We use an ice flow model to reconstruct the retreat of Jakobshavn Isbræ since 1850, forced by increased ocean warming and calving. Fjord geometry governs locations of rapid retreat: narrow and shallow areas act as intermittent pinning points for decades, followed by delayed rapid retreat without additional climate warming. These areas may be used to locate potential moraine buildup. Evidently, historic retreat and geometric influences have to be analyzed individually for each glacier system.