Articles | Volume 12, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1157-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1157-2018
Research article
 | 
04 Apr 2018
Research article |  | 04 Apr 2018

Canadian snow and sea ice: historical trends and projections

Lawrence R. Mudryk, Chris Derksen, Stephen Howell, Fred Laliberté, Chad Thackeray, Reinel Sospedra-Alfonso, Vincent Vionnet, Paul J. Kushner, and Ross Brown

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Short summary
This paper presents changes in both snow and sea ice that have occurred over Canada during the recent past and shows climate model estimates for future changes expected to occur by the year 2050. The historical changes of snow and sea ice are generally coherent and consistent with the regional history of temperature and precipitation changes. It is expected that snow and sea ice will continue to decrease in the future, declining by an additional 15–30 % from present day values by the year 2050.