Articles | Volume 11, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 11, 469–482, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-469-2017
The Cryosphere, 11, 469–482, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-469-2017

Research article 09 Feb 2017

Research article | 09 Feb 2017

Ground-penetrating radar reveals ice thickness and undisturbed englacial layers at Kilimanjaro's Northern Ice Field

Pascal Bohleber et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Pascal Bohleber on behalf of the Authors (11 Nov 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 Nov 2016) by Kenichi Matsuoka
AR by Pascal Bohleber on behalf of the Authors (29 Nov 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (03 Jan 2017) by Kenichi Matsuoka
AR by Pascal Bohleber on behalf of the Authors (09 Jan 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Our study is the first to use ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to investigate ice thickness and internal layering at Kilimanjaro’s largest ice body, the Northern Ice Field (NIF). For monitoring the ongoing ice loss, our ice thickness soundings allowed us to estimate the total ice volume remaining at NIF's southern portion. Englacial GPR reflections indicate undisturbed layers within NIF's center and provide a first link between age information obtained from ice coring and vertical wall sampling.