Articles | Volume 11, issue 6
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-2943-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-2943-2017
Research article
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14 Dec 2017
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 14 Dec 2017

In situ nuclear magnetic resonance response of permafrost and active layer soil in boreal and tundra ecosystems

M. Andy Kass, Trevor P. Irons, Burke J. Minsley, Neal J. Pastick, Dana R. N. Brown, and Bruce K. Wylie

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Latest update: 24 Jul 2024
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Short summary
Geophysical methods have wide applications to permafrost studies. We show that borehole nuclear magnetic resonance is a valuable geophysical tool to rapidly characterize the liquid water content and unfrozen pore space in warm permafrost through simulation and field study. This technique is also sensitive to the ice nucleation process in situ. This method, which is applicable in a variety of soil types, can be used for single observations or for time-lapse monitoring of permafrost changes.