Articles | Volume 10, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 10, 799–810, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-799-2016
The Cryosphere, 10, 799–810, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-799-2016

Research article 15 Apr 2016

Research article | 15 Apr 2016

Growth of a young pingo in the Canadian Arctic observed by RADARSAT-2 interferometric satellite radar

Sergey V. Samsonov et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Sergey Samsonov on behalf of the Authors (17 Feb 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Feb 2016) by Tingjun Zhang
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (18 Feb 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (26 Feb 2016)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (26 Feb 2016) by Tingjun Zhang
AR by Sergey Samsonov on behalf of the Authors (07 Mar 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (09 Mar 2016) by Tingjun Zhang
AR by Sergey Samsonov on behalf of the Authors (11 Mar 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Mar 2016) by Tingjun Zhang
Download
Short summary
We describe the growth of a very large diameter pingo in the Tuktoyaktuk Coastlands. Analysis of historical data showed that ground uplift initiated sometime between 1935 and 1951 following lake drainage and is largely caused by the growth of intrusive ice. This study demonstrates that satellite radar can successfully contribute to understanding the dynamics of terrain uplift in response to permafrost aggradation and ground ice development in remote polar environments.