Articles | Volume 10, issue 6
The Cryosphere, 10, 2573–2588, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-2573-2016
The Cryosphere, 10, 2573–2588, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-2573-2016

Research article 02 Nov 2016

Research article | 02 Nov 2016

Seasonal evolution of the effective thermal conductivity of the snow and the soil in high Arctic herb tundra at Bylot Island, Canada

Florent Domine et al.

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Short summary
The thermal conductivity (TC) of the snow and top soil greatly impacts the permafrost energy budget. We report the first winter-long monitoring of snow and soil TC in the high Arctic. The data and field observations show the formation of a highly insulating basal depth hoar layer overlaid by a more conductive wind slab. Detailed snow physics models developed for alpine snow cannot reproduce observations because they neglect the strong upward vertical water vapor flux prevailing in Arctic snow.