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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-116
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-116
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  12 May 2020

12 May 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal TC.

Landfast ice growth and displacement in the Mackenzie Delta observed by 3D time-series SAR speckle offset tracking

Byung-Hun Choe1, Sergey V. Samsonov1, and Jungkyo Jung2 Byung-Hun Choe et al.
  • 1Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON K1S 5K2, Canada
  • 2Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA

Abstract. This study investigates the growth and displacement of landfast ice along the shoreline of the Mackenzie Delta by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) speckle offset tracking (SPO). Three-dimensional (3D) offsets were reconstructed from Sentinel-1 ascending and descending SAR images acquired on the same dates during the November 2017–April 2018 and October 2018–May 2019 annual cycles. The results showed horizontal and vertical displacements of floating landfast ice caused by ice breakups and pressure ridges, which are mainly driven by drift sea ice motions and Mackenzie Delta discharges. Cumulative vertical offsets of approximately −1 to −2 m were observed from freshwater landfast ice, which is due to longer radar penetration into the ice-water interface with increasing landfast ice thickness. Numerical ice thickness model estimates confirmed that the cumulative vertical downward offsets indicate the growth of freshwater landfast ice thickness. Time-series analysis showed that significant growth and displacement of floating landfast ice in the Mackenzie Delta occur between November and January.

Byung-Hun Choe et al.

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Byung-Hun Choe et al.

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Short summary
This study proposes a methodology to monitor the growth and displacement of landfast ice in the Mackenzie Delta. 3-dimensional speckle offsets were reconstructed with ascending and descending orbit SAR data. Horizontal and vertical displacements caused by landfast ice breakups and pressure ridges were observed. Cumulative vertical offsets of approximately −1 to −2 m were observed, which is due to longer radar penetration into the ice-water interface with increasing landfast ice thickness.
This study proposes a methodology to monitor the growth and displacement of landfast ice in the...
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