Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2017-210
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2017-210

  02 Nov 2017

02 Nov 2017

Review status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Review article: The hydrology of debris-covered glaciers – state of the science and future research directions

Katie E. Miles1, Bryn Hubbard1, Tristam D. L. Irvine-Fynn1, Evan S. Miles2, Duncan J. Quincey2, and Ann V. Rowan3 Katie E. Miles et al.
  • 1Centre for Glaciology, Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, UK
  • 2School of Geography, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
  • 3Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

Abstract. Debris-covered glaciers (DCGs) are characterised by distinct hydrological systems that differ fundamentally from those observed on clean-ice valley glaciers. To date, most studies of DCG hydrology have focused on supraglacial hydrology, given that surface streams are broadly accessible and repeat observations can lead to conceptual models of channel evolution. Few have characterised englacial conduits and their layout, and none have directly investigated potential subglacial drainage networks in any setting. In this review, we summarise the current state of knowledge relating to DCG hydrology with a global focus, and present our own field observations to illustrate the distinct nature of DCG landforms on a receding high-elevation glacier in the Himalaya. We draw on recent work that has gone some way towards providing a process-based understanding of the formation and evolution of englacial and subglacial hydrological pathways and consider the role that DCG hydrology plays in regulating water supplies to downstream communities, contrasting this information with clean-ice examples. We conclude by identifying important knowledge gaps that might be considered priorities for future research into DCG hydrology.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Katie E. Miles et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Katie E. Miles et al.

Katie E. Miles et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 1,854 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,231 569 54 1,854 54 69
  • HTML: 1,231
  • PDF: 569
  • XML: 54
  • Total: 1,854
  • BibTeX: 54
  • EndNote: 69
Views and downloads (calculated since 02 Nov 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 02 Nov 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 1,641 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 1,627 with geography defined and 14 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 19 Sep 2021
Download

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Short summary
The production and routing of meltwater through glaciers is important because that water influences glacier sliding, and represents a resource in some instances and a hazard in others. Despite this importance, very little is known about the hydrology of debris-covered glaciers, which are commonly located at high altitudes. Here, we present a review of the hydrology of debris-covered glaciers, summarizing the current state of knowledge and identify potential future research priorities.