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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Lake Vida is one of the largest lakes in the McMurdo dry valleys, Antarctica, and has the thickest known ice cover of any lake on Earth. For the first time, Lake Vida was drilled to a depth of 27m. With depth the ice cover changes from freshwater ice to salty ice interspersed with thick sediment layers. It is hypothesized that the repetition of sediment layers in the ice will reveal climatic and hydrologic variability in the region over the last 1000--3000 years.
Articles | Volume 9, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 9, 439–450, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-439-2015
The Cryosphere, 9, 439–450, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-439-2015

Research article 04 Mar 2015

Research article | 04 Mar 2015

Stratigraphy of Lake Vida, Antarctica: hydrologic implications of 27 m of ice

H. A. Dugan et al.

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Short summary
Lake Vida is one of the largest lakes in the McMurdo dry valleys, Antarctica, and has the thickest known ice cover of any lake on Earth. For the first time, Lake Vida was drilled to a depth of 27m. With depth the ice cover changes from freshwater ice to salty ice interspersed with thick sediment layers. It is hypothesized that the repetition of sediment layers in the ice will reveal climatic and hydrologic variability in the region over the last 1000--3000 years.
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