Articles | Volume 17, issue 7
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-17-2851-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-17-2851-2023
Research article
 | 
14 Jul 2023
Research article |  | 14 Jul 2023

Precursor of disintegration of Greenland's largest floating ice tongue

Angelika Humbert, Veit Helm, Niklas Neckel, Ole Zeising, Martin Rückamp, Shfaqat Abbas Khan, Erik Loebel, Jörg Brauchle, Karsten Stebner, Dietmar Gross, Rabea Sondershaus, and Ralf Müller

Viewed

Total article views: 1,913 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,303 538 72 1,913 66 54
  • HTML: 1,303
  • PDF: 538
  • XML: 72
  • Total: 1,913
  • BibTeX: 66
  • EndNote: 54
Views and downloads (calculated since 19 Sep 2022)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 19 Sep 2022)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 1,913 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 1,800 with geography defined and 113 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 21 Jul 2024
Download
Short summary
The largest floating glacier mass in Greenland, the 79° N Glacier, is showing signs of instability. We investigate how crack formation at the glacier's calving front has changed over the last decades by using satellite imagery and airborne data. The calving front is about to lose contact to stabilizing ice islands. Simulations show that the glacier will accelerate as a result of this, leading to an increase in ice discharge of more than 5.1 % if its calving front retreats by 46 %.