Articles | Volume 15, issue 8
The Cryosphere, 15, 3577–3593, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3577-2021
The Cryosphere, 15, 3577–3593, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-3577-2021

Research article 03 Aug 2021

Research article | 03 Aug 2021

Thermal legacy of a large paleolake in Taylor Valley, East Antarctica, as evidenced by an airborne electromagnetic survey

Krista F. Myers et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (15 Mar 2021) by Elizabeth Bagshaw
AR by Krista Myers on behalf of the Authors (12 May 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 May 2021) by Elizabeth Bagshaw
RR by Stefano Nerozzi (04 Jun 2021)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (23 Jun 2021) by Elizabeth Bagshaw
AR by Krista Myers on behalf of the Authors (24 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, has undergone hundreds of meters of change in recent geologic history. However, there is disagreement on when lake levels were higher and by how much. This study uses resistivity data to map the subsurface conditions (frozen versus unfrozen ground) to map ancient shorelines. Our models indicate that Lake Fryxell was up to 60 m higher just 1500 to 4000 years ago. This amount of lake level change shows how sensitive these systems are to small changes in temperature.