Articles | Volume 15, issue 1
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-233-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-233-2021
Review article
 | Highlight paper
 | 
25 Jan 2021
Review article | Highlight paper |  | 25 Jan 2021

Review article: Earth's ice imbalance

Thomas Slater, Isobel R. Lawrence, Inès N. Otosaka, Andrew Shepherd, Noel Gourmelen, Livia Jakob, Paul Tepes, Lin Gilbert, and Peter Nienow

Viewed

Total article views: 61,409 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
51,596 9,521 292 61,409 333 338
  • HTML: 51,596
  • PDF: 9,521
  • XML: 292
  • Total: 61,409
  • BibTeX: 333
  • EndNote: 338
Views and downloads (calculated since 14 Aug 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 14 Aug 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 61,409 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 56,351 with geography defined and 5,058 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Discussed (final revised paper)

Latest update: 19 Feb 2024
Download

The requested paper has a corresponding corrigendum published. Please read the corrigendum first before downloading the article.

Short summary
Satellite observations are the best method for tracking ice loss, because the cryosphere is vast and remote. Using these, and some numerical models, we show that Earth has lost 28 trillion tonnes (Tt) of ice since 1994 from Arctic sea ice (7.6 Tt), ice shelves (6.5 Tt), mountain glaciers (6.1 Tt), the Greenland (3.8 Tt) and Antarctic ice sheets (2.5 Tt), and Antarctic sea ice (0.9 Tt). It has taken just 3.2 % of the excess energy Earth has absorbed due to climate warming to cause this ice loss.