Articles | Volume 14, issue 12
The Cryosphere, 14, 4379–4404, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4379-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 4379–4404, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4379-2020

Research article 04 Dec 2020

Research article | 04 Dec 2020

Satellite observations of snowfall regimes over the Greenland Ice Sheet

Elin A. McIlhattan et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (16 Mar 2020) by Louise Sandberg Sørensen
AR by Elin McIlhattan on behalf of the Authors (19 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (30 Mar 2020) by Louise Sandberg Sørensen
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (25 May 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (25 May 2020) by Louise Sandberg Sørensen
AR by Elin McIlhattan on behalf of the Authors (04 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Aug 2020) by Louise Sandberg Sørensen
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (16 Sep 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (30 Sep 2020) by Louise Sandberg Sørensen
AR by Elin McIlhattan on behalf of the Authors (06 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (19 Oct 2020) by Louise Sandberg Sørensen
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Short summary
Snowfall builds the mass of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) and reduces melt by brightening the surface. We present satellite observations of GrIS snowfall events divided into two regimes: those coincident with ice clouds and those coincident with mixed-phase clouds. Snowfall from ice clouds plays the dominant role in building the GrIS, producing ~ 80 % of total accumulation. The two regimes have similar snowfall frequency in summer, brightening the surface when solar insolation is at its peak.